Hi Ho Sweet Potato Puffs

Hi Ho Sweet Potato Puffs are a great addition to any meal. Whipped sweet potatoes are surrounding by a marshmallow and crispy cracker crumbs to make for a unique way to serve sweet potatoes.

Sweet potatoes are whipped and surround a marshmallow to make for a delightful sweet potato side dish.

Hi Ho Sweet Potato Puffs are a great addition to any meal. Whipped sweet potatoes surround sweet marshmallows and are finished off with crispy cracker crumbs. Such a unique way to serve sweet potatoes. This is my grandmother’s recipe from like a zillion years ago. She made them with Hi Ho crackers, a brand of crackers similar to Ritz crackers. So if your store doesn’t not have Hi Ho Crackers, Ritz Crackers will work just fine.

How do They Make Marshmallows?

Everyone with a sweet tooth likes marshmallows. They taste especially wonderful all gooey and dripping on the end of a stick around the campfire. (Watch this fun video to see how to make s’mores the next time you take the kids camping.) They are called marshmallows because originally they were made from the gelatinous sap contained in the root of the marshmallow plant. As the name infers, this plant belongs to the mallow family and grows mainly in wet or marshy areas.

What Else Have Marshmallows Been Used For?

Beginning around the 9th Century BC, the Greeks were using marshmallows to soothe sore throats and heal wounds. In addition, a balm concocted from the plant’s sap was applied to aching teeth and to bee stings. Arabs used a poultice of ground-up marshmallow leaves as an anti-inflammatory. The Romans discovered that marshmallows did good work as a laxative. By the time the Middle Ages came around, marshmallows served as a treatment for a variety of conditions – everything from upset stomachs to insomnia and chest colds.

Who First Made Sweets from the Marshmallow Plant?

Probably the ancient Egyptians. They combined marshmallow sap with honey and nuts, a sweet treat that was nothing like today’s marshmallows and was reserved for the nobility. For hundreds of years afterward, the plant served as a food source only in times of famine because the plant itself is quite tough and very bitter. In the 19th Century, French confectioners created Pâté de guimauve a soft, spongy dessert made by whipping up dried marshmallow roots with egg whites, sugar, and water. Sold in the form of a “healthy” lozenge or bar, the guimauve became a big hit. However, there was a bit of a problem. Drying and preparing the marshmallow root took a day or two, so eventually confectioners substituted gelatin for the plant extract. Read more about the history of the marshmallow by clicking here.

Want to Have More Fun with Marshmallows?

Try these copykat marshmallow recipes that all include the sweet treat.

Sweet potatoes are whipped and surround a marshmallow to make for a delightful sweet potato side dish.

This recipe is by Virginia McDowell. Jefferson City, Mo. 1960.

Sweet potatoes are whipped and surround a marshmallow to make for a delightful sweet potato side dish.

Hi Ho Sweet Potato Puffs

You can recreate this vintage recipe for the Hi Ho Sweet Potato Puffs. 
5 from 1 vote
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Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Sweet Potato
Servings: 8
Calories: 198kcal

Ingredients

  • 4 ounces melted butter
  • 28 ounces canned sweet potatoes
  • 1 egg separated
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 6 large marshmallows
  • 3/4 cup crushed crackers about 13

Instructions

  • Mash potatoes; beat in egg yolk, salt, cinnamon, melted butter. Scoop potatoes into 6 equal mounds. Poke a marshmallow into the center of each mound and roll into a ball covering the marshmallow.
  •  Beat the egg white until foamy. Dip each potato ball in egg white. Roll in cracker crumbs and coat well. Bake at 350 degrees for 10 minutes or until done.

Nutrition

Calories: 198kcal | Carbohydrates: 20g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 12g | Saturated Fat: 7g | Cholesterol: 50mg | Sodium: 311mg | Potassium: 341mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 4g | Vitamin A: 14460IU | Vitamin C: 2.4mg | Calcium: 36mg | Iron: 0.7mg
Tried this recipe?Mention @CopyKatRecipes or tag #CopyKatRecipes!

About Stephanie

I recreate your favorite restaurant recipes, so you can prepare these dishes at home. I help you cook dinner, and serve up dishes you know your family will love. You can find most of the ingredients for all of the recipes in your local grocery store.

Stephanie is the author of CopyKat.com's Dining Out in the Home, and CopyKat.com's Dining Out in the Home 2.

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